Wheelchair & Platform Lifts

Wheelchair lifts are also called "platform lifts." That's because they all have a flat horizontal platform that can take a person in a wheelchair, scooter, or power chair from one level to another. 

There are two basic types of wheelchair lifts.  The more common type is a Vertical Platform Lift (VPL).  It works like a small elevator.  A person in a wheelchair rolls onto the platform at one level and they ride up or down to another level.  

Another type of wheelchair lift is called an Inclined Platform Lift (IPL).  It works like a stair lift, except the rail holds a platform that can carry a person in a wheelchair up and down a set of stairs, gliding above the steps from one level to the next.

Why Use Us?

  • 10+ years of experience in Charlotte and the Carolinas

  • Thousands of satisfied clients 

  • Free expert advice

  • Free in-home assessments

  • Equipment from a variety of the best manufacturers

  • Client-centered approach

  • Prompt local service

  • Full support of manufacturer warranties

  • One-year labor warranty on all new installations

  • A+ BBB rating

Benefits

  • For anyone that uses a wheelchair, scooter, or power chair, platform lifts provide safe and easy access to multiple levels of a home or business.

  • Platform lifts are also well suited to many business applications, since they can be used by anyone who has trouble using stairs.

Vertical Platform Lifts

In many North and South Carolina homes, vertical platform lifts have been installed in garages or beside porches, to give people easy access to their homes.  (They are also called "porch lifts" for that reason.)

Vertical platform lifts can also be used as small, versatile, and less expensive elevators.  They can lift a rider from a few feet, to as much as 20 feet.  And they typically can lift as much as 750 pounds.

 

VPLs can be designed to stop at several landings, with exits on the front, side or back of the cab.  And they can be stand-alone, placed inside a factory hoist way, or used in a building shaft like a typical elevator.   That flexibility makes vertical platform lifts a perfect solution for many businesses, churches and schools. 

Below are our more popular models from Savaria and Harmar in several common settings.  

Typical Requirements

  • Vertical platform lifts need flat upper and lower landing areas, to give a person in a wheelchair enough room to move in and out of the lift easily.  

  • They also need enough space at the base on the unit for the side tower, the walled platform, and the ramp (when one is needed for that application).  

  • The lower surface also must be solid -- typically made of concrete.

  • Vertical platform lifts use locking gates or doors at all upper landings, to prevent anyone from falling through an opening when the lift is not at that level.  When there isn't an upper doorway (like on a porch), the lifts come with factory gates that serve the same purpose.

  • Vertical platform lifts also must not have any "pinch points," where hands, fingers, or toes could get caught and hurt by the movement of the cab.  That usually means they need a flush vertical surface along the path of the cab openings for the upper levels.

  • Most vertical platform lifts need just a normal 120-volt household power supply.

Of course, determining the requirements for each situation is part of our free on-site assessment.  We are often able to meet many of these requirements.  (For example, we have built many small decks inside garages, to serve as the upper landing by the house doorway.)  When we can't meet the requirements ourselves, we would be glad to work with your contractor or help you find one to do the work for you.

Common Features

Bottom Safety Pan:  Stops the lift from moving down when it senses an obstruction (like a toy or pet).

Automatic Safety Brake:  If for any reason the lift starts to move down too quickly, the brake stops it. 

Automatic Folding Ramp:  Is lowered at the bottom landing, raised for travel above it.

Popular Options

DC Power from Rechargeable Batteries:  So the lift will keep working even during a power failure.

Factory Hoistway:  To protect the rider and lift, resembling an enclosed elevator shaft.

Factory Doors & Gates:   Reducing the need for special contract work at upper and lower landings.

Hydraulic Operation:   Smoother, quieter, and stronger than typical screw drives.

Inclined Platform Lifts

Inclined platform lifts are a great solution for wheelchair riders when there isn't room for an elevator or a vertical platform lift.

These lifts ride on rails that can be mounted to a wall or to a series of posts that are attached to the steps.  The platforms are unfolded to carry a wheelchair and rider, and folded back to fit close to wall when not is use.

 

Like stair lifts, inclined platform lifts come in different versions for straight and curved stairways.  They can also be designed to accommodate intermediate landings and more than two levels.

Below are our most popular models from Savaria and Harmar.

Typical Requirements

  • Inclined platform lifts need to be attached to a sturdy wall or a sturdy set of steps.

  • These lifts also need flat upper and lower landing areas, to give a person in a wheelchair enough room to move on and off of the lift platform easily.  

  • They also need enough space on the floor at the base of the stairway for the rail, rail posts (when used) and the unfolded platform and ramp. 

  • Inclined platform lifts typically need a stairway that is at least 36 inches wide (measured from wall to wall, or wall).  If the rail is to be mounted to rail posts instead of the wall, then the width needs to be wider still.

  • Most inclined platform lifts need just a normal 120-volt household power supply.

Of course, determining the requirements for each situation is part of our free on-site assessment.  When we can't meet the requirements ourselves, we would be glad to work with your contractor or help you find one to do the work for you.

Common Features

Folding Platfrom & Ramps:  These unfold for the rider, and fold back up to free the stairs for others.

Bottom Safety Pan:  This keeps  the lift from being lowered on something (like a toy or pet)..

Automatic Safety Brake:  If for any reason the lift starts to move down too quickly, the brake stops it. 

Popular Options

DC Power from Rechargeable Batteries:  So the lift will keep working even during a power failure.

Power Folding Platform:  So the rider doesn't have to manually raise or lower the platform.

Installation, Warranties, and Service

We recommend that all wheelchair lifts be installed by professional installers that have experience installing that particular brand and type of lift.  We have that experience with all the brands we carry.

We install and provide service for every lift we sell.  That includes full support of the manufacturers' warranties, plus a one-year labor warranty that we provide for all new lift installations.  We also offer regular maintenance and service plans for all of our lifts.